The History of the Tourbillon
Jun
5
6:00 pm18:00

The History of the Tourbillon

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Stephen Forsey, co-founder of Greubel Forsey and CompliTime SA

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

Watchmakers have always sought to improve the precision of mechanical timekeepers, and the tourbillon has been a significant invention in this adventure. At the June 2017 meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Stephen Forsey will retrace the historical origins of the tourbillon from the pocket watch to the wristwatch. In addition, a selection of Greubel Forsey timepieces will be on display.

Robert Greubel & Stephen Forsey

Robert Greubel & Stephen Forsey began working together in 1999 on a new generation of tourbillons for the wristwatch, culminating with the launch in 2004 of their Double Tourbillon 30°. Today, Greubel Forsey continues to innovate with a wide range of complicated timepieces, including their newly announced Grande Sonnerie.

Stephen Forsey

About Stephen Forsey
Stephen Forsey was born in St. Albans, England, where he inherited his father’s passion for the intricacies of mechanics. From 1987 he specialized in antique watch restoration, and he subsequently became the head of Asprey of London’s prestigious watch restoration department; he then furthered his horological education at WOSTEP (Watchmakers of Switzerland Training and Educational Program). After moving to Switzerland in 1992, Stephen met Robert Greubel and started working on the most complicated mechanical movements. In 1999, he left to work independently and in 2001 he co-founded CompliTime with Robert Greubel. Together, they then launched Greubel Forsey in 2004.

Glashütte on Board – 130 Years of Marine Chronometers From Saxony
May
1
6:00 pm18:00

Glashütte on Board – 130 Years of Marine Chronometers From Saxony

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Ulrike Kranz - Glashütte Original

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

For its May meeting, the Horological Society of New York welcomes a special guest from Germany, Ulrike Kranz. Kranz will lecture on the history of the German Marine Chronometer, a topic she is very familiar with after her time working at the German Watch Museum and position today at Glashütte Original. In addition to the evening lecture, a selection of historic timepieces from the German Watch Museum will be on display.

With the founding of the German Empire in 1871 and growing interest in international trade, the German Navy became more and more important to the German government. To reduce reliance on English imports (including the well-known English marine chronometers), significant support was provided to encourage the production of marine chronometers in Germany. In 1886 the first marine chronometers from Glashütte were sent to the German Naval Observatory in Hamburg for testing. In the following years, numerous innovations and technical improvements brought international attention to marine chronometers manufactured in Glashütte.

After World War II Germany was divided, but the production of chronometers in Glashütte continued. The state-owned company VEB Glashütter Uhrenbetriebe took up the tradition and manufactured a large number of both mechanical and quartz marine chronometers. These were deployed primarily on GDR ships but also exported worldwide.
 
Although today navigation at sea is performed around the world using GPS, Glashütte in Saxony remains a significant location for the production of marine chronometers and observation watches. Following the reunification of Germany, the Glashütte astronomical observatory was restored. Today it houses a chronometer testing facility, which also officially certifies the chronometers made by Glashütte Original – the legal successor of the VEB Glashütter Uhrenbetriebe.

Ulrike Kranz

Ulrike Kranz

About Ulrike Kranz
Ulrike Kranz is the head of Corporate Communications for Glashütte Original. Previously, Kranz worked at the German Watch Museum in Glashütte. She holds a MSc in Ethics & Corporate Governance from the University of London and a B.A. from the University of Greenwich.

2017 Gala & Charity Auction
Apr
3
6:00 pm18:00

2017 Gala & Charity Auction

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

As the Horological Society of New York embarks on its 151st year, join us as we reestablish an important tradition - the Annual Gala. Beginning in 1933, HSNY's Annual Gala's were lavish affairs, attended by members and guests representing all parts of the watch and clock making industry in New York City. Carrying on the success of 2016's 150th Anniversary Gala, the 2017 Gala & Charity Auction will be held on April 3.

Highlights

 

Charity Auction

Over 40 years ago, a collection of timepieces was bequeathed to the Horological Society of New York, consigned to a vault, and forgotten. The current Board of Directors has re-discovered these treasures, and through deliberation decided to use them to commence with a new Charity Auction tradition to begin and support the HSNY Endowment Fund.

HSNY's 2017 Charity Auction will take place at the Gala, and is made possible by Heritage Auctions. There will be no buyer's premiums for the lots. Online bidding will open on March 20 and will be closed the day of the Gala. All final bidding will take place live in the room during the Gala. HSNY's Endowment Fund is being established with the goal to ensure long-term success for the Society.

 

Presentation of the Henry B. Fried Scholarship

Most watchmaking schools in the USA are free. Tuition is covered by a sponsoring brand, and usually the only school expense that the students cover are their tools. These schools are full-time two year programs, meaning paying for living expenses can be difficult. This is where the Henry B. Fried Scholarship comes in; the Horological Society of New York wants to help American watchmaking students succeed in every way. The winner of the 2017 Henry B. Fried Scholarship will be announced at the 2017 Gala.

 

Dinner & Drinks

Enjoy a large selection of appetizers, entrees and desserts, with an open bar from 6:00pm - 9:00pm. The suggested attire is business formal. Discounted tickets are available to HSNY members, using your membership password as a promotional code at the ticket checkout.

We look forward to seeing you there!

All proceeds from this event go towards the Horological Society of New York's ongoing educational programs, and the Horological Society of New York's Endowment Fund. The Horological Society of New York is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, federal tax identification number 13-6139887.


HSNY thanks our sponsors for their generous support

How to Win (and Sometimes Lose) at Watch Auctions
Mar
6
6:00 pm18:00

How to Win (and Sometimes Lose) at Watch Auctions

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

William Massena - Managing Director of TimeZone.com

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

Watch auctions can be intimidating even for the most experienced collectors. What questions should you ask a specialist? How do you bid successfully? What pitfalls should you avoid? At the March 2017 meeting of the Horological Society of New York, William Massena will address these questions and more. Massena's illustrated lecture will explore all aspects of the world of watch auctions, including key auction houses in the international watch market, the role of auctions in the context of watch collecting, and nuances of catalogue descriptions.

William Massena

William Massena

About William Massena
William Massena is the Managing Director of TimeZone.com, the world’s largest online watch discussion forum, to which he has been a key contributor since its founding in 1995. He is also a partner at Digital Luxury Group, a Geneva-based marketing and communication research company for luxury brands, and a Trustee of the Horological Society of New York. Previously, he was the Chief Operating Officer and Managing Director of Antiquorum S.A., the leading horological auction house and a consultant for Bonhams Auctioneers.

Time is Money - How to Make a Living in the World of Watches
Feb
6
6:00 pm18:00

Time is Money - How to Make a Living in the World of Watches

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

John Reardon - International Head of Watches, Christie's

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

The watch industry employs hundreds of thousands of people in over 100 countries around the world. A career in the world of watches is a dream come true and many individuals have found their professional path in unique and unexpected ways. At HSNY's February 6 meeting, Reardon will explore how people make a living within the world of watches and horology, including stories of how they broke into the business and their day to day lives in the "game of the time." The scope of Reardon's lecture will include stories from the auction industry, museum world, retailers, vintage watch dealers, watchmakers, marketers, designer, photographers, bloggers, social influencers, and more, all underlining how people make a living doing what they love.
 
For people looking to break into the watch world professionally or simply looking to use their horological knowledge to generate income, Reardon will share stories of numerous industry insiders and the many paths people take be part of this fascinating worldwide community.

John Reardon

John Reardon

About John Reardon 
John Reardon first became interested in clocks and watches while interning at the American Watch and Clock Museum in his hometown of Bristol, Connecticut where he learned clock repair and restoration. While completing a degree in history and languages, he worked as a curatorial assistant at the Willard House and Clock Museum in Grafton, Massachusetts. His passion for all things horological brought him to the auction world in New York in the 1990s where his academic and commercial focus turned to watches. In 2001, he joined Patek Philippe USA and become a noted author, writer and researcher in all things related to the famous Swiss manufacture. After a decade with Patek Philippe, he rejoined the auction world and is presently the International Head of Watches at Christie’s. He is a contributing writer for the Life and Times feature in the Patek Philippe Magazine and has written three books on the history of watches, most notably Patek Philippe in America: Marketing the World’s Foremost Watch.

Pictured above: Auctioneer Thomas Perazzi, courtesy of Christie's

Horology in Art
Jan
10
6:00 pm18:00

Horology in Art

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Bob Frishman - Founder and Owner of Bell-Time Clocks

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

Jacques-Louis David, The Emperor Napoleon in His Study at the Tuileries, 1812

For more than 2,000 years, timekeepers have appeared in art. An ancient Roman mosaic depicting “Plato’s Academy” shows a pedestal-mounted sundial, a 1285 manuscript illuminates a water clock, several 16th century Renaissance portraits by Titian feature small gilt mechanical table clocks, American folk and genre painters include shelf, banjo and tall clocks in their domestic scenes, Marc Chagall often depicts a German wall clock from his Eastern European boyhood home, and Jamie Wyeth’s 1994 view on Monhegan Island has his teenage model Orca Bates posed next to a stately grandfather clock.

Unlike random photo snapshots, nothing in paintings, drawings, prints and fine-art photography appears by accident.  Each artist decides what is included. In many, if not most, instances where clocks and watches are present, they have symbolic or metaphorical significance. When mechanical timepieces first appeared in the 13th century, analogies to “God the clockmaker” were common, linking a clock’s steady self-propelled action to the motion of the entire universe.  During the Renaissance, timekeepers demonstrated a person’s or city’s affluence, discipline, and technological sophistication. Later artworks continued to use clocks and watches to symbolize mortality and the need for humans to use wisely their brief time on earth. More modern depictions may emphasize the growing tyranny of timekeeping that governs all our waking hours. Sometimes the timepiece simply shows the time, but usually for a specific reason.

In an educational and entertaining illustrated lecture combining art and horology histories, Bob Frishman will project images of more than 150 artworks, most by well-known artists. In some, the clock or watch is boldly apparent; in others, it is a minor but significant character that needs pointing out.  For each, Frishman will briefly discuss the artist, the context, and the timekeeper. Art lovers will enjoy this multi-century panorama of art, and horological enthusiasts will view timepieces with important roles in these period settings.

Bob Frishman, photographed by Kevin Harkins

About Bob Frishman
Bob Frishman is founder and owner of Bell-Time Clocks in Andover, Massachusetts.  He has collected, restored, researched, written and lectured about timekeepers since 1980.  He has repaired more than 7,000 clocks and watches, and sold more than 1,700. He is a Fellow of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Chairman of the NAWCC Time Symposium Committee, and a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers (London, UK). Along with dozens of articles on many horology topics, he writes a “Horology in Art” feature for each issue of the NAWCC magazine. 

He is organizing a “Horology in Art” NAWCC symposium in October, 2017, at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. A roster of eminent art historians and curators already have been recruited to discuss artworks in their areas of expertise, and each will be followed by a horologist who will describe timepieces depicted in the projected artworks.

Intertwining Roots - Watchmaking, Artisanship & Technology
Dec
12
6:00 pm18:00

Intertwining Roots - Watchmaking, Artisanship & Technology

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Michael Friedman - Historian for Audemars Piguet

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

While most objects and technologies that we engage with on a daily basis will be upgraded in a matter of a couple years or less, expertly crafted mechanical watches are designed and constructed to last "forever." Mechanical watches are among a tiny category of objects of permanence that stand in defiance of the planned obsolescence that defines the vast majority of contemporary consumerism. This special place that watches holds in the present day is directly connected to the fact that watchmaking is among the most interdisciplinary fields in existence, deeply rooted in various spheres within both the arts and sciences. 

Friedman will explore how watchmaking's intertwined relationship with art and technology has been central to its evolution during the past 500 years. By examining key moments during the 1500s, the mid 1600s, the early 1800s, the Industrial Revolution, the mid 20th century, the Quartz Era and the Present Day, Friedman will shed light as to why mechanical watches continue to galvanize collectors and enthusiasts worldwide and why we are in a golden age of highly creative and innovative watchmaking. 

About Michael Friedman
Michael L. Friedman is an established horological expert, appraiser, curator, lecturer, auctioneer and producer. He is the Historian at Audemars Piguet. Michael's extensive career in watches and clocks began in 1996 at Willard House & Clock Museum where he served as assistant curator. In 1997, he joined The National Watch & Clock Museum as Curator where he co-developed 15,000 square feet of exhibition space devoted to the history of time measurement - from sundials to the atomic clock. In 1999, Michael was named VP & Department Head of Watches for Christie's in New York. In 2003 he founded MLF Horology which provided consultant and curator services for international collectors, institutions and auction houses.

Theories of Time
Nov
14
6:00 pm18:00

Theories of Time

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Dr. Demetrios Matsakis - Chief Scientist for Time Services, U.S. Naval Observatory

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

Philosophers have speculated on the nature of time for millennia. Einstein brought the question to a new level, but today many scientists and philosophers think they have an even deeper understanding. Unfortunately they don't always agree with each other.  At the November meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Dr. Demetrios Matsakis will give an equationless review of some of these theories, and let you decide what to believe.

About Dr. Demetrios Matsakis
Dr. Demetrios Matsakis is a physicist who went to MIT and U.C. Berkeley, where he studied under the Nobel-prize winning professor who invented the laser, and constructed two special-purpose lasers to study the molecular clouds where stars are born. After graduating he used radio astronomy to measure the wobbles in the Earth’s rotation, by looking at quasars near the edge of the observable universe. Later he became interested in timekeeping with atomic clocks and rapidly spinning neutron stars (pulsars). He went on to manage the Time Service Department of the US Naval Observatory, which uses over 100 atomic clocks to set the time for GPS and much of the world. Under his management, a set of four atomic fountains were designed and built, measuring time to 16 decimal places. This is currently the most precise 24x7 measurement system ever built by mankind to measure anything. He is a past president of the International Astronomical Union’s Time Commission, has served on many international commissions related to the timekeeping art, represented the U.S. in Geneva, and published over 100 papers along with one short story that is admittedly pure science fiction.

Dr. Demetrios Matsakis

Video courtesy The Atlantic.

The History of the Calendar
Oct
24
6:00 pm18:00

The History of the Calendar

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Hosted by François-Paul Journe, Founder, Montres F.P. Journe, Switzerland

Video recordings of meetings are available to HSNY members.

Hidden below the dial, the calendar complication holds centuries worth of fascinating technical development. From simple to perpetual calendars, that development has never stopped. Today, the complication represents a desire to master the specificities of the multiple calendar systems in use worldwide. At the October meeting of the Horological Society of New York, François-Paul Journe will host a discussion on the history of calendars with a panel of world-class experts.

Mr. Journe will be joined by Pierre Halimi Lacharlotte, General Manager of Montres Journe America, Jack Forster, Editor in Chief of HODINKEE, Noel Poirier, Director of the National Watch & Clock Museum and Keith Lehman, Editor of NAWCC's WatchNews. A display of important calendar pocket watches from Mr. Journe’s personal collection and from the National Watch & Clock Museum will be on display, as well as the new F.P. Journe Quantième Perpétuel with instantaneous jump.

François-Paul Journe

François-Paul Journe

About François-Paul Journe
In the exclusive world of haute horology, François-Paul Journe has explored the measurement of time for over 33 years with a unique sense of creativity and innovation. As an independent contemporary master watchmaker, he draws on his historical knowledge and expertise to face the most daring horological challenges, conceiving entirely new calibres with a timeless consistency.
 
At the crossroad between Arts and Haute Horology, the independent F.P. Journe Manufacture produces its movements in 18K rose Gold, a first in the watch world and unique signature of the brand.  In the respect of the haute horology tradition, Francois-Paul Journe labeled his watches with ­Invenit et Fecit- (invented and made), guaranteeing an exclusive in-house calibre, entirely invented, constructed, and assembled in the Geneva workshops. F.P. Journe produces no more than 900 precision watches per year.  These innovative unparalleled mechanisms such as the Chronomètre à Résonance, the Sonnerie Souveraine or the Tourbillon Souverain have earned F.P. Journe the world’s most prestigious horological awards.

About Pierre Halimi Lacharlotte
After completing his studies at ESCP (Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Paris), Mr. Halimi-Lacharlotte established a company in Miami for the distribution of Swiss watches in the USA. 

In 1987 at Baselworld, he met François-Paul Journe, an independent watchmaker with a thoroughly different approach who draws on his historical knowledge to create innovative precision chronometers.  This changed his vision of the watch industry in favor of independent horology with a genuine authenticity, offering manufacture calibres and he discovers the exclusive world of haute horology.
 
In 2009, Mr. Halimi-Lacharlotte became F.P. Journe’s partner in the company in charge of the Americas.  After introducing independent haute horology to the American consumer, he has developed the American market into a success with four F.P. Journe Boutiques,  six Espaces, and a network of top qualified retailers. 

About Jack Forster
Jack Forster is Editor in Chief of HODINKEE. He first became interested in watches as a student in graduate school, and spent many years collecting and repairing vintage pocket watches as a hobby. From 2006 to 2015 he was a part of Revolution Press Ltd, first as Group Technical Editor, and then as Editor in Chief for the US edition of Revolution Magazine. He is the author of Cartier: Time Art, a catalogue for the exhibition of the same name, which chronicles the history of watch and clockmaking at Cartier from its inception to the present day.

About Noel Poirier
Noel Poirier is the Museum Director for the National Watch & Clock Museum, operated by the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors. Mr. Poirier has been with the Museum for ten years, overseeing the Museum’s achievement of accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums. He serves on the Board of Advisors of Wristwatch Magazine and is a member of the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors, the Horological Society of New York, and the Early American Industries Association.

About Keith Lehman
Keith Lehman is the Editor of NAWCC's WatchNews. Hired by the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors in 2015, Lehman had been a freelance artist for the National Watch and Clock Museum since 2011. He worked for the Tibetan Aid Project and at the Odiyan Retreat Center in California where he helped with bronze casting for the Cintamani Temple and designed Western-style Tibetan prayer books for the World Peace Ceremony in Bodh Gaya, India.

The History of Chronographs, From the Beginning Until 1980
Sep
12
6:00 pm18:00

The History of Chronographs, From the Beginning Until 1980

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Dr. Sébastien Chaulmontet – Head of Movement Design for Manufacture La Joux-Perret, Arnold & Son and Angelus Watches, Switzerland

Doors open at 6:30pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

The technical development of the chronograph is a fascinating story, and there may be no one more qualified to tell it than Dr. Sébastien Chaulmontet, Head of Movement Design for Manufacture La Joux-Perret, Arnold & Son and Angelus Watches. At the September meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Dr. Chaulmontet will lecture on the history of the chronograph, beginning with its predecessors, to the creation of the so-called modern (pocket) chronograph.

Moving towards present day, the industrialization of the complication will be discussed, along with an overview of American pocket chronographs. The three major ébauche (blank) producers will be highlighted along with the chronograph makers using in-house movements like Angelus, Excelsior Park, Lemania, Longines, Minerva, Movado and Universal. Famous models from important brands as Breitling, Enicar, Heuer, Omega, Patek Philippe, Rolex or Zenith shall of course not be missed. Finally, some interesting aspects of collecting antique and vintage chronographs will be presented.

About Sébastien Chaulmontet
Sébastien Chaulmontet is the author, with Dr Joël Pynson, of the book "Chronographs for Collectors." He is also an expert collector of antique and vintage chronographs. Doctor of law and lawyer by training, he is today a watch movement creator and head of innovation at Manufacture La Joux-Perret, Arnold & Son and Angelus.

Photographs by Joël Pynson

A Story of Old Horology in London
Jul
5
6:00 pm18:00

A Story of Old Horology in London

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Seth Kennedy – Antiquarian Horologist, London
Doors open at 6:00pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

London has a deep horological history, stretching back for hundreds of years. How did the horological industry fit in throughout London’s intense urban development? What is it like to work on antique timepieces today in modern London? Antiquarian Horologist Seth Kennedy will discuss these questions and more at the July meeting of the Horological Society of New York. In addition, Kennedy will present a detailed look at 18th and 19th century watches that he has restored, including the making of pocket watch cases from scratch.

About Seth Kennedy
Kennedy came to antiquarian horology after a career as a mechanical engineer. In his earlier years of horological work Kennedy underwent informal training from a highly accomplished watchmaker and has since developed his own specialized tools and techniques. His focus is on the repair and restoration of pocket watches, dating from 17th century to the early 20th century.

Dynamic Poising: A Conversation With Gravity
Jun
13
6:00 pm18:00

Dynamic Poising: A Conversation With Gravity

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

John Teifert - Manager, Technical Workshop, Swatch Group U.S.
Doors open at 6:00pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

Please note that this meeting is on June 13, rather than our usual first Monday of the month.

Dynamic poising is an important skill that allows watchmakers to minimize positional errors. The operation today is fairly straightforward as long as you understand the theory of why you're making the adjustment. The history of dynamic poising helps us appreciate the value of a well adjusted movement and the difficulty involved in making dynamic adjustments. Often poorly understood, we will discuss the history, theory, and practice of proper dynamic poising.

About John Teifert
John Teifert is a lifelong watch collector, a WOSTEP certified watchmaker and graduate of the OSU-Okmulgee School of Watchmaking. After graduation he earned ten years experience at the bench and eventually completed tourbillon training at Breguet. He currently manages Swatch Group's watchmaking workshop in Secaucus, NJ.

Investing in Watchmaking for the 21st Century
May
2
6:00 pm18:00

Investing in Watchmaking for the 21st Century

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

William Massena - Managing Director of TimeZone.com

Doors open at 6:00pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

Rolex "Paul Newman" Daytona

Rolex "Paul Newman" Daytona

This illustrated talk will explore the promise versus the reality of watches as an alternative asset class. Can watches be an effective investment or is this merely a marketing myth? The talk will look at notable auction results as case studies, consider how marketing affects the horology industry today and what challenges this poses to the watchmakers of tomorrow.

About William Massena

William Massena is the Managing Director of TimeZone.com, the world’s largest online watch discussion forum, to which he has been a key contributor since its founding in 1995. He is also a partner at Digital Luxury Group, a Geneva-based marketing and communication research company for luxury brands. Previously, he was the Chief Operating Officer and Managing Director of Antiquorum S.A., the leading horological auction house.

John Harrison: Longitude, the Precision Watch and Pendulum Clock
Apr
4
6:00 pm18:00

John Harrison: Longitude, the Precision Watch and Pendulum Clock

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Rory McEvoy - Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, UK

This illustrated talk will take a look at the extraordinary story of John Harrison and his work in developing navigational clocks and watches for use at sea. It will explore his journey and unlikely beginnings, look at influences evident in his work found in the mechanical ‘DNA’ of his sea clocks and highlight some of the aspects of his work that are significant to the modern world.

Rory McEvoy

Rory McEvoy

About Rory McEvoy
Trained in conservation and restoration of antique clocks at West Dean College, Chichester in 1998-9 and subsequently worked at the bench, specialized in conservative restoration of ‘Golden Age’ English clocks. After a three-year stint as clock specialist for Bonhams Auctioneers, joined the National Maritime Museum as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory. Research interests include: the development and application of precision watches and clocks, the life and work of George Graham FRS and the more modern history of time standardization and distribution.  

HSNY 150th Anniversary Gala
Mar
29
6:00 pm18:00

HSNY 150th Anniversary Gala

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

In March of 1866, a group of New York City watchmakers formed a society to further their interests both scientifically and socially. 150 years later we are continuing our founders' mission to Advance the Art and Science of Horology. Join us as we celebrate our past and look forward to a bright future!

Speakers

Proclamations & Awards

  • Mayoral proclamation honoring HSNY from the City of New York
  • Proclamation from the German government
  • Presentation of the The Howard Fass award

Food, Drink & Entertainment

Enjoy a large selection of appetizers, entrees and desserts, with an open bar from 6:00pm - 9:00pm. Live music by the Diamond Chips, honoring our Society's German heritage.

All attendees will receive a free copy of the limited edition HSNY 150th Year Archival Book, authored by Michael Osnato, HSNY Archivist & Historian.

Suggested attire: business formal.

All proceeds from this event go towards the Horological Society of New York's ongoing educational programs. The Horological Society of New York is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, federal tax identification number 13-6139887.


HSNY thanks our sponsors for their generous support

Watch Portraiture: Taking a Closer Look With Macro Photography
Mar
7
6:00 pm18:00

Watch Portraiture: Taking a Closer Look With Macro Photography

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Atom Moore - Art Director analog/shift

Photography is a very important part of keeping people engaged with horology. Since gaining access to a wide variety of watches through the RedBar Crew, Atom Moore has focused his lens ever closer into the intricate details of these fascinating timepieces. Taking portraits of watches has become his passion. The tiny mechanical details are often hard to see or understand for those who are not watchmakers or experts in the field. To help shine a light on the complex details in mechanical watches, Atom will share some insight into his passion and methods for creating watch portraits. In presenting watches as portraits, he hopes to engage not just existing watch enthusiasts, but the general public as well.

Our Shared Horological Heritage: The National Watch & Clock Museum
Feb
1
6:00 pm18:00

Our Shared Horological Heritage: The National Watch & Clock Museum

  • HSNY at the General Society Library

Please note: This meeting is at our new meeting and lecture venue, the General Society Library at 20 W 44th St. (between 5th & 6th Ave) in Midtown Manhattan. Doors open at 6:00pm, the lecture begins at 7:00pm.

Noel Poirier, Museum Director

Discover the stories and methods used by the National Watch & Clock Museum to engage the general public in the history, arts, science and technology of our shared horological experience. Housing the largest and most comprehensive public collection of timepieces in North America, the National Watch & Clock Museum may soon stand alone as the only cultural institution actively preserving and presenting this important and meaningful aspect of human existence in the US. What are the challenges faced in presenting this story? How will the Museum continue to grow and develop in the future to ensure the story continues to be presented? Why is this story so important to our modern society? Mr. Poirier will provide background on the Museum, share its collection and its future in this candid and open discussion.

Visit the National Watch & Clock Museum's Youtube page.

Watch Collecting in 2016
Jan
11
7:30 pm19:30

Watch Collecting in 2016

  • Horological Society of New York

Kiran Shekar

Promoting interest in watch collecting (or even simply watch appreciating) is good not only for us in HSNY, but also for society as a whole.  Join us for this talk all about watch collecting.  We’ll start by diving into the cultural place that watches hold in our society, and talk about what place they should hold.  Then we’ll look at the current state of the hobby, and try to predict the future by drawing parallels with two similar but more developed hobbies, collecting cars and collecting art.  Lastly we’ll provide action steps that each of us can do going forward to draw more people to the wonderful world of watches.

61/60: Thinking Through Leap Seconds
Dec
7
7:30 pm19:30

61/60: Thinking Through Leap Seconds

  • Horological Society of New York

Sara Morawetz - Artist

A leap second is a unit of measure irregularly added to our global system of time-keeping to account for perturbations in the rotation rate of our planet. In the broader context of human experience, it is tempting to relegate individual leap seconds to the inconsequent — assuming that such infinitesimal adjustments carry little resonance. However, the cumulative effect of this mechanism is nothing less than that which holds the sun overhead at midday, and without it, our time becomes unfastened to the solar cycles in which its steeped.

At a meeting of the World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC) in November this year, a decision was taken on whether leap seconds will continue to be included in our system of time. Artist Sara Morawetz, who has been investigating this contingent facet of time-keeping, will join us to discuss both the philosophical implications of the WRC’s decision and what this means for the way time is measured into the future. These issues will have lasting implications not only for the various time-based technologies with which we live, but also for the very fabric of time-keeping itself and what it’s function is in relation to both ourselves and our planet.

The performance work '61/60' that Sara has created in response to this decision is part of a continuing interest in the eccentricities of standardization, in particular the standardization of time. In addition to the question of the leap second, Sara will also discuss her recent performance 'How the Stars Stand', a project made in consultation with Dr. Michael Allison of the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Studies, in which the artist lived by Martian sols (a 24h 39m 'day') for a period of 37 days (36 sols).

The Saxony Way of Independent Watchmaking
Nov
17
7:30 pm19:30

The Saxony Way of Independent Watchmaking

  • Horological Society of New York

Master Watchmaker, CEO - Lang & Heyne

Traditions From 18th Century Applied in Today's Time

As a fifth-generation watchmaker, Marco Lang learned early on to value the art of watchmaking by observing his father. He fulfilled his dream of owning a watch manufacture with the foundation of Lang & Heyne, based in Dresden, Germany.

Lang & Heyne's work is based on 2 pillars; one is using modern manufacturing systems (CAD or CNC), and the other is using traditional methods. The Lang & Heyne watchmakers often use rediscovered techniques from previous centuries, resulting in timepieces that have a distinct German style. 

At this HSNY special event, Marco Lang will give a deep insight in the creative process of Lang & Heyne watches.

Marco Lang - Master Watchmaker & CEO, Lang & Heyne

A Nuts and Bolts Love Letter to the Seiko 7S26 Movement
Nov
2
7:30 pm19:30

A Nuts and Bolts Love Letter to the Seiko 7S26 Movement

  • Horological Society of New York

John Davis - Watchmaker

Watches are machines. While some of them may also be works of art, they cannot escape their machineness. There is undoubtedly something fascinating about those examples of the watchmaker's craft, but there is also something to be learned from the droves of micro-machines that are designed and constructed with only performance and economy in mind. There is craft involved in the ability to engineer a movement for production runs in the tens of thousands that is wholly other than the craft involved in manufacturing a movement by hand. It is a skill that I respect and admire, while having even less understanding of its intricacies than I do of traditional watchmaking skills. Being a fan of Seiko's watches though, I won't let my ignorance get in the way of taking apart the 7S26 in an attempt to discover its hows and guess at its whys.

The Forgotten History Of American Chronometer Standards
Oct
5
7:30 pm19:30

The Forgotten History Of American Chronometer Standards

  • Horological Society of New York

Aaron Berlow - Watchmaker

Today the word “Chronometer” is associated almost exclusively with Swiss timepieces, but many may not know that a set of Chronometer standards was formalized by Webster C. Ball in America in the 1890s. The criteria required back then is not incredibly different from today's requirements (minus some pocket watch and material specific requirements.) In attributing the word chronometer solely to Swiss timepieces we easily forget an American disaster that came to define a period of accurate and stunningly beautiful timepieces known as the Railroad Chronometers.

Horological Sightseeing in Paris
Aug
31
7:30 pm19:30

Horological Sightseeing in Paris

  • Horological Society of New York

Nicholas Manousos - Vice President, HSNY & Technical Editor, HODINKEE

"The City of Light" could also be called "The City of Watches & Clocks" for its numerous contributions to horology. Join us for a photo presentation by Nicholas Manousos detailing items of interest to the horological tourist in Paris, including the Musée des Arts et Métiers.

August Summer Social
Aug
3
6:00 pm18:00

August Summer Social

  • Amsterdam Ale House

One more Summer Social! Join us August 3 at the Amsterdam Ale House for a Summer Social event with your fellow HSNY members. There will be no lecture at Riverside Memorial Chapel for this meeting. Instead, meet across the street at the Ale House for good food, drinks and discussion.

http://www.amsterdamalehousenyc.com/

July Summer Social
Jul
6
6:00 pm18:00

July Summer Social

  • Amsterdam Ale House

Summer is here! Join us July 6 at the Amsterdam Ale House for a Summer Social event with your fellow HSNY members. There will be no lecture at Riverside Memorial Chapel for this meeting. Instead, meet across the street at the Ale House for good food, drinks and discussion.

http://www.amsterdamalehousenyc.com/

The History of Watch Timing Machines
Jun
1
7:30 pm19:30

The History of Watch Timing Machines

  • Horological Society of New York

Dale Sutton - Owner, Time Machine Repair

To repair a watch, you need to regulate it, and to regulate a watch, you need a timing machine. Timing machines are indispensable to watchmakers and are fascinating to study. Dale Sutton is owner of Time Machine Repair, a unique company focusing on repair and sales of new and used watch timing and cleaning machines. Mr. Sutton's lecture will focus on the technical development of timing machines, from the beginning to modern day.

An Evening With Kari Voutilainen
May
18
7:00 pm19:00

An Evening With Kari Voutilainen

  • The Varick Room at Tribeca Cinemas
Kari Voutilainen

Kari Voutilainen

The Horological Society of New York and HODINKEE present An Evening With Kari Voutilainen.

Kari Voutilainen is one of the most respected watchmakers on the planet. He is truly one of the leading independent craftsmen that makes high-end watchmaking what it is today, and his timepieces are as rare and valuable as any in the world. Join us for what is sure to be a memorable evening! HODINKEE's Benjamin Clymer will host a Q&A session with Mr. Voutilainen, starting at 8pm. Doors open at 7pm with a 2 hour open bar.

Proceeds from this event benefit the Horological Society of New York's education program, providing free watchmaking education to the public since 1950.

Going Once, Going Twice, Sold! An Overview of Timepiece Auctions
May
4
7:30 pm19:30

Going Once, Going Twice, Sold! An Overview of Timepiece Auctions

  • Horological Society of New York

Michael Fossner - Consignment Director, Heritage Auctions

Timepiece auctions are a significant factor in today’s world of Horology. Not only do they allow people to buy and sell. The auctions also provide them the opportunity to see items they never would otherwise, and lend a public stage to establish values in the second hand watch market. This evening’s lecture shall cover the basics of these intriguing events. Attendees will be able to ask Michael further questions to delve into deeper topics; and will be treated to a nice surprise at the end of the meeting!

The Watchmaker's Apprentice - NYC Premiere
Apr
28
7:00 pm19:00

The Watchmaker's Apprentice - NYC Premiere

  • Tribeca Cinemas

This event is sold-out!

The Horological Society of New York & DAM Productions present the New York City Premiere of the Watchmaker's Apprentice, starring George Daniels and Roger Smith.

Join us for an exclusive evening with one of the world's greatest watchmakers! Reception begins at 7pm. Film begins at 8pm. Q&A with Roger Smith & Director David Armstrong, hosted by HODINKEE's Benjamin Clymer immediately following the film.

Proceeds from this event benefit the Horological Society of New York's education program, providing free watchmaking education to the public since 1950.

Demystifying the Value of Buying "Swiss Made"
Apr
6
7:30 pm19:30

Demystifying the Value of Buying "Swiss Made"

  • Horological Society of New York

Feature Presentation

Daniel Mooncai, Watchmaker
The ETA 6497 is a common movement used by many of today's watchmaking firms. This month, we will compare and discuss the ETA 6497 and its Asian counterpart. We will delve into differences in aesthetics, functionality, and compatibility. And hopefully demystify the value of buying "Swiss Made." 

Special Guest

Jordan Ficklin, Executive Director - American Watchmakers-Clockmakers Institute
Mr. Ficklin will give a brief overview of the AWCI's activities and answer questions pertaining to the Institute.